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Chelsea's £1 cuppa, Barcelona's £90 shirt and the £97 ticket: The cost of football laid bare

Chelsea's £1 cuppa, Barcelona's £90 shirt and the £97 ticket: The cost of football laid bare
By Eurosport

15/10/2015 at 08:03Updated 15/10/2015 at 18:32

The average cost of the cheapest seat in the Premier League has passed £30 for the first time, according to a new study.

Although most fans have found the cost of watching football has dropped or remained the same over the last year, BBC Sport's 'The Price of Football' study has found that the cheapest tickets in the top flight have risen overall.

Eleven clubs in the Premier League raised the price of their cheapest tickets - it now averages £30.68, up from £28.80 last season.

Overall in British football, 70 per cent of tickets had the price frozen or even reduced for the 2015-16 season - just under 52 per cent had a price freeze and 18 per cent reduced.

The study also covers other football-related costs such as replica kits and refreshments.

Manchester United has the most expensive strip at £103 for a junior (including shorts, socks, name and number) and £118 adult.

The club has the most expensive shirts too - £60 for an adult shirt and £45 for a junior.

That is still considerably cheaper than Barcelona's adult shirt, which costs £89.55 - the most expensive out of the 227 teams in the study.

Aberdeen's £55 adult shirt and their £43 junior shirt were the costliest in Scotland.

The cheapest season ticket at German champions Bayern Munich is £104.48.

Other findings include:

:: Liverpool and Glasgow Rangers have the most expensive cup of tea at £2.50. The average is £2.09 and cost just £1 at Chelsea.

:: The average pie costs £3.35 in the top flight, up 1.82 per cent. Kidderminster Harriers charge £4.50 for their award-winning pie but they cost just £1 at Conference side Braintree.

:: In Scotland, at £1.20, the cheapest pies are at Forfar and Queen's Park.

:: Arsenal again have the most expensive match day ticket in the Premier League at £97. The cheapest matchday ticket in the top flight is £22 at Leicester.

:: Chelsea's cheapest match day ticket is £52 - no other club charges as much for its cheapest ticket.

Football - Arsenal v Manchester United - Barclays Premier League - Emirates Stadium - 4/10/15Manchester United's Wayne Rooney in action with Arsenal's Alexis SanchezReuters / Dylan Martinez

Football - Arsenal v Manchester United - Barclays Premier League - Emirates Stadium - 4/10/15Manchester United's Wayne Rooney in action with Arsenal's Alexis SanchezReuters / Dylan MartinezReuters

:: The Scottish Premiership's cheapest ticket now costs £20.17 on average after a 1.2 per cent fall in price - cheaper the Championship and League One.

:: Tickets in the Women's Super League in England, which saw attendances increase by 48 per cent after the summer's World Cup, cost less than £5.

:: Derby, Reading and Huddersfield all have £10 match day tickets - the cheapest in the top five leagues in England and only matched by Southport in the Conference.

:: The average price of a programme is now £3.42, up nearly seven per cent.

:: Swansea were the only club out of 230 across the UK who declined to take part in the study.

The average admission price paid in the Football League during the 2014-15 campaign was £14.08 per supporter - £15.65 in the Championship, £11.72 in League One and £11.58 in League Two.

Football League chief executive Shaun Harvey said: "Football League clubs continue to offer compelling football at a price that is affordable, particularly for those buying season tickets who are rewarded for their loyalty and financial commitment with the best-value ticket offerings.

"The significant numbers of season ticket holders at matches, along with ever-greater numbers of young fans, has resulted in the average price paid per paying spectator being as low as £14 across the League's 72 clubs.

"Clearly others, such as adults and those paying on the day, will usually pay more. Clubs therefore need to ensure that their ticketing policies provide the right balance between fair value for supporters and generating the income that sustains on-field performance, which overwhelmingly they do."

Reporting via PA Sport

OUR VIEW

It's hard to know where to start with this story, which crops up every year. It's a lot of money, but then again is it really that far out of line with other forms of sport, or indeed entertainment? A £50+ cheapest seat at Stamford Bridge seems a huge amount, but it's less than the price of a seat to the Test match at Lord's, albeit for fewer hours entertainment. And ultimately if people are happy to pay, isn't it then up to the clubs to decide the extent to which they're willing to take advantage of their fans? And in a world where every fan wants their team to splash out big money on the best players, clubs can hardly slash one of their own most important revenue streams, regardless of the TV money washing around.

On the other hand, for many fans supporting their team is a compulsion rather than an entertainment option - and football costs have soared up far quicker than inflation, putting some fans in the situation where they are forced to dig ever deeper to service their addiction.

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