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England's women rated... and where to see them play now

England's women rated... and where to see them play now

06/07/2015 at 05:36Updated 06/07/2015 at 07:13

The glorious Lionesses return from their World Cup campaign this week - and they're straight back into domestic action. Where can you see them play? And where else might they be appearing?

Carrie Dunn reviews an epic month for England's Women's team, who clinched third place with a 1-0 extra time win over Germany.

(Marks out of 10 awarded by eurosport.co.uk newsroom)

1. Karen Bardsley - 7/10: As with all goalkeepers, she made some glaring mistakes – but she saved her best performance for last, dominating the box against Germany and picking up the player of the match award. She won't want to remember that bizarre spell against Canada when half of her face suddenly swelled up and forced her eye closed; that incident has still not been explained. Maybe we need Paxman to interrogate her and find out.

See her play at: Manchester City

2. Alex Scott - 7/10: The right back was used when Mark Sampson required more attacking options, with her speed and her crossing ability vital to the team. Scott's spoken many times before about her wish to compete on Strictly Come Dancing – it didn't happen after the Olympics, but it might just be a possibility now.

See her play at: Arsenal

3. Claire Rafferty - 8/10: The defender is always of interest to broadsheet newspapers because she balances her football commitments with her job as an analyst in the City. Football fans will be more intrigued about the strength of character it's taken for Rafferty to come back from three ACL injuries over the course of her career.

See her play at: Chelsea

4. Fara Williams - 9/10: England's record cap-holder, Williams only recently spoke about her lengthy spell of homelessness throughout her career, which came as a surprise to her team-mates as well as fans. Obviously she's an incredibly tough and courageous person, so stepping up to take three vital penalties at a World Cup is next to nothing.

See her play at: Liverpool

5. Steph Houghton - 9/10: The centre half will be the one who gets most of the spotlight – she was one of the faces of the London 2012 Olympics after her goal against Brazil, grabbing the front pages, and as the captain she'll step up on behalf of the team. She did that on Thursday after the defeat to Japan – she'll enjoy revelling in the bronze medal much more.

See her play at: Manchester City.

6. Laura Bassett - 7/10: Everyone loves a good redemption arc. Bassett's tournament was brave and bruising – she picked up a flying arm from France's Camille Abily in the very first game, leaving her with a huge black eye – and she was the unfortunate one who scooped the ball into the net against Japan to knock England out of the tournament. She picked herself straight back up again, though, and was absolutely immense against Germany. Her joyful face at the final whistle could and probably will be used to advertise the brilliance of sport. Expect to see her on chat shows near you very soon.

See her play at: Notts County

 

7: Jordan Nobbs - 6/10: The vice-captain is, obviously, a vital part of the squad; unfortunately Nobbs's fitness meant that she only got one game, against Colombia, when her creativity was crucial. She's only 22, though – she'll have more tournaments and be able to impress properly.

See her play at: Arsenal

8. Jill Scott - 8/10: The lanky midfielder's re-emergence into the team in the latter stages of the tournament made a huge difference, offering width against Canada and tireless energy against Japan.

See her play at: Manchester City

9. Eniola Aluko - 6/10: One of the most well-known of the squad thanks to her media appearances and footballer brother, she's articulate and presentable, and she'll continue her punditry work. Her showings on the pitch didn't quite live up to her profile, sidelined after the second game in favour of Toni Duggan before returning for the bronze medal play-off. This is her third World Cup – and she still hasn't scored a goal in any of them.

See her play at: Chelsea

10. Karen Carney - 9/10: The visionary driving force behind all of England's best attacks this tournament, the little “wizard” grabbed her opportunity when Sampson brought her on as a second-half sub against Mexico and never looked back. She's spoken publicly about her depression and how at times she has hated football and never wanted to play again – she's turned it around and would seem to be an ideal face of any kind of wellbeing campaign.

See her play at: Birmingham City.

11. Jade Moore - 7/10: The young midfielder was essential to England's plans throughout; perhaps never showy, but always reliable.

See her play at: Birmingham City

12: Lucy Bronze - 10/10: England's player of the tournament – solid in defence, sizzling on the attack, and two terrific goals to add to her showreel. A Golden Ball nomination alongside the likes of Carli Lloyd and Aya Miyama demonstrates what an impact she made.

See her play at: Manchester City

13: Siobhan Chamberlain - 7/10: The substitute goalkeeper might have only played half a match, but what a vital half a match. Chamberlain was called on when Bardsley was forced off with that odd eye injury, and she was utterly solid when she could have been forgiven for being a tad nervy. She said afterwards that she is always prepared to come off the bench and take over, so she's mentally and physically ready at all times.

See her play at: Arsenal (although she's currently second choice behind Ireland's Emma Byrne)

14. Alex Greenwood - 7/10: An explosive substitution at left back against Mexico, Sampson praised her “world-class” crossing ability, which led directly to Karen Carney's goal.

See her play at: Notts County

 

15. Casey Stoney - 9/10: The elder stateswoman of the squad, this was a magnificent month for the centre-half, who also picked up an MBE in the Queen's Birthday Honours. Stoney, measured and sensible off the pitch as well as on, took the brave step last year of publicly coming out as gay, and followed that with the announcement of the birth of her twins with partner Megan Harris. The media interest at that point was voracious and she dealt with it all brilliantly – perhaps now they'll invite her on to the daytime sofas to talk about her work rather than her personal life.

See her play at: Arsenal

16. Katie Chapman - 8/10: The midfielder returned to the England team after a lengthy absence, and got the surprise of her life when her husband and three children flew out to surprise her on her birthday. Chapman invariably gets asked about the trials of being a mother and an elite athlete – perhaps Loose Women might snap her up as a guest.

See her play at: Chelsea

17. Jo Potter - 7/10: Another player who was recalled for this tournament, Potter's versatility made her incredibly useful to the squad – she's ostensibly a midfielder but played excellently at the back during the bronze medal play-off.

See her play at: Birmingham City

18: Toni Duggan - 7/10: Never quite as explosively exciting as she was during qualifying or indeed as she is in the domestic league, she was asked to hold the ball up rather than run at defences. She did as well as she could have been expected to do. Duggan's likely to be shielded a little bit from the media glare – she's had run-ins in recent months, with incidents such as “blacking up” for a fancy dress party, despite being a Kick it Out anti-discrimination ambassador.

See her play at: Manchester City

19: Jodie Taylor - 9/10: She came into the tournament with an injury, and finished the tournament absolutely exhausted. The bit in between, though, was amazing. Taylor's played all around the world, utterly dedicated to finding opportunities to be a full-time professional footballer, and it shows. She can hold the ball up, and has the ability to switch on some pace that makes defences panic.

See her play at: Portland Thorns – she's the only overseas-based player in the squad

 

20. Lianne Sanderson - 7/10: Woefully underused, but the striker's sheer physical presence won England the penalty that secured them third place in the World Cup. Sanderson has always been a very vocal advocate for LGBT causes, and also founded a girls' football academy in India.

See her play at: Arsenal

21. Carly Telford - N/A: The self-proclaimed “last woman standing”, she was the only England player not to get any minutes on the pitch, and was apparently not fit prior to the game against Germany. This is her third World Cup as third choice keeper.

See her play at: Notts County. She can keep goal. Really.

22. Fran Kirby - 9/10: Possibly the revelation of the tournament, England's 'mini-Messi' hit the headlines for her goalscoring and her liveliness. Kirby's social media feeds after a win always include a mention of her late mother; one would expect more children's charities to want the young striker as a spokesperson to show the possibilities of overcoming bereavement and depression.

See her play at: Reading – the only WSL2 player in the squad

23. Ellen White - 7/10: Another player who came back from injury – this time a cruciate ligament rupture – to make it to Canada, White was used sparingly but effectively at the start and close of the tournament.

See her play at: Notts County

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